CHI 2022 CROWD SCIENCE WORKSHOP
Reimagining Global Crowdsourcing for Better Human-AI Collaboration (REGROW)

April 30, 2022
CHI 2022 CROWD SCIENCE WORKSHOP
Reimagining Global Crowdsourcing for Better Human-AI Collaboration (REGROW)

April 30, 2022
Crowdworkers silently enable much of today's AI-based products, with several online platforms offering a myriad of data labelling and content moderation tasks through convenient labour marketplaces. The HCI community has been increasingly interested in investigating the worker-centric issues inherent in the current model and seeking for potential improvements that could be implemented in the future.

This workshop explores how a reimagined perspective on crowdsourcing platforms could provide a more equitable, fair, and rewarding experience. This includes not only the workers but also the platforms, who could benefit e.g. from better processes for worker onboarding, skills-development, and growth. We invite visionary takes in various formats on this topic to spread awareness of worker-centric research and developments to the CHI community.

As a result of interactive ideation work in the workshop, we articulate a future direction roadmap for research centred around crowdsourcing platforms. Finally, as a specific interest area, the workshop seeks to study crowdwork from the context of the Global South, which has been arising as an important but critically understudied crowdsourcing market in recent years.
Our aim is to collectively explore what the future of the crowdsourcing platforms could look like 10–20 years from now.
Keynote Speaker
Ricardo Kawase
Team Lead at mobile.de GmbH/Adevinta
Since a few years, mobile.de is heavily investing in machine learning solutions to create a better online experience for its users. Personalization, recommendations and search are some examples where we already apply state of the art machine learning algorithms. In these examples, content, shape, position and order in which information is presented, have a substantial impact on human decision and a significant impact in business KPIs. At the same time that we try to predict users' intent and facilitate access to certain information, we implicitly learn from users' actions what are their preferences to support these predictions. This creates a vicious cycle, introducing bias that is constantly reinforced by human implicit feedback. Many machine learning solutions rely on the learnings from implicit human feedback. However, implicit feedback carries the biases that are introduced by our own algorithms and the limitations of how information is presented. In this talk, I deep dive in two main topics, personalization and search at mobile.de, how bias affects the machine learning algorithms and the strategies we use to mitigate it.
Focus Areas
Following a juried process, we invite anyone interested in the future of crowdsourcing to submit vision statements with an overarching question of what could these platforms look like in 10-20 years from now.

We focus on the following topics:

Platform affordances: onboarding issues, skills development, personal growth opportunities

Psychological support and feedback for workers

Trust between workers and requesters: Fair quality assurance and good communication

Tooling-related support measures for workers

Novel data management solutions that can, for example, lead to new incentive mechanisms

New use cases for platforms beyond what is feasible currently, leveraging, e.g., XR technologies, metaverse concepts, or other futuristic technologies

Ensuring the fundamental work rights of crowd workers, for example, the legality of their contracts, access to workplace benefits (e.g., sick leave, parental leave, pensions)

(The list is non-exclusive.)
Accepted Talks
• Senjuti Dutta, Rhema P. Linder, Anastasia Kuzminykh, and Alex C. Williams. Doing Work from Where You Are: AI HIT Management Dispatching Work Tailored to Context

• Merlin Knaeble, Mario Nadj, Alexander Maedche, and Nico Loewe. Toward User-adaptive Interactive Labeling on Crowdsourcing Platforms

• Hadeel Farhan, Daniel Krasnonosenkikh, Gwendolyn Payne, Luca Sharbani, and Saiph Savage. Reading Comprehension across Physical and Digital Mediums

• Sandy Gould, Laura Lascau, Duncan Brumby, and Anna L. Cox. Intractable problems of crowdsourcing

• Laura Nguyen, Emily Gringorten, Bryson McClure, Sanjana Dutt, and Saiph Savage. Digital Mental Health Resources and Digital Workers

• Chloe Gold, Remy Lewinter, Peiying Li, Zoe Morris, Nickhil Tekwani, and Saiph Savage. Consideration of Cultural Background in Interface Design and Productivity

• Alfonso Barajas and Saiph Savage. Invisible Labor and Gig Workers

• Corey An, Alexander Chang, and Saiph Savage. Impact of Binaural Beat Therapy on Crowdworkers

• Niels van Berkel, Eike Schneiders, and Rune Møberg Jacobsen. Addressing Repetition in Crowdsourcing: A Concept for Fast-Form Entry
Key Dates
1
December 13. Website opens
2
February 18. Submission deadline
3
March 4. Author notifications
4
April 30. REGROW workshop
Program
The REGROW workshop starts at 9:00am EST (UTC-5) and has the following program.

09:00–09:30: Workshop introduction and keynote
09:30–09:50: Rapid introduction to the accepted ideas/work
09:50–10:30: Break out in teams, start co-designing new futures
10:30–11:00: Coffee break, informal panel discussion
11:00–12:00: Teamwork continues, focusing on further conceptualising new platform affordances
12:00–13:00: Lunch break
13:00–14:00: Team presentations and discussion
14:00–14:15: Teams create a synthesis of their work in a shared workspace online
14:15–14:45: Panel discussion focusing on the created synthesis
14:45–15:00: Final thoughts, closing the workshop

The program is flexible.
Organizers
Andy Alorwu
University of Oulu, Finland
Saiph Savage
Northeastern University, USA
Niels van Berkel
Aalborg University, Denmark
Dmitry Ustalov
Toloka
Alexey Drutsa
Toloka
Oliver Bates
Lancaster University, UK
Danula Hettiachchi
RMIT University, Australia
Ujwal Gadiraju
TU Delft, The Netherlands
Jorge Goncalves
University of Melbourne, Australia
Simo Hosio
University of Oulu, Finland
250-Word Call for Participation
This hybrid workshop reimagines crowdsourcing to better answer to the modern global worker-centric challenges and specific issues in the Global South.

Following a juried process, we invite anyone interested in the future of crowdsourcing to submit vision statements with an overarching question of what could these platforms look like in 10–20 years from now. To this end, we focus on the following topics (for the full list of topics, please see the workshop website):

• Platform affordances: onboarding issues, skills development, personal growth opportunities
• Psychological support and feedback for workers
• Trust between workers and requesters: Fair quality assurance and good communication
• Tooling-related support measures for workers
• Novel data management solutions that can, for example, lead to new incentive mechanisms
• New use cases for platforms beyond what is feasible currently, leveraging e.g. XR technologies, metaverse concepts, or other futuristic technologies
• Ensuring the fundamental work rights of crowd workers, for example, the legality of their contracts, access to workplace benefits (e.g. sick leave, parental leave, pensions)

We solicit submissions through the workshop website in the ACM Primary Article Template, with links to e.g. online videos or other necessary resources. We do not impose page limits, but we encourage the authors to keep submissions as concise as possible.

At least one author of each accepted submission must attend the workshop and that all participants must register for both the workshop and for at least one day of the conference.
Do you want to to collaborate with us?
Just drop a message to regrow@crowdcomputing.net